Police Foil Suspected Plot To Cause Mayhem At Queen’s Funeral After Fishing Eco-activist Out Thames

Police have foiled a suspected eco-mob plot to cause chaos at the Queen’s funeral, MailOnline can reveal.

Met officers fished an activist with a GoPro camera on his head from the River Thames after he was caught paddling on a float near the Houses of Parliament.

The unfortunate man in his twenties was spotted in a no-go area in the early hours as police began preparing for the largest security operation the country has ever seen ahead of Her Majesty’s state funeral on Monday.

They ducked in after a concerned member of the public called 999, believing they had seen a body floating in the water at 3:25 a.m. Monday.

Met officers fished an activist with a GoPro camera on his head from the River Thames after he was caught paddling on a float near the Houses of Parliament

Met officers fished an activist with a GoPro camera on his head from the River Thames after he was caught paddling on a float near the Houses of Parliament

They found him swimming to shore before clambering onto the jetties to be greeted by the waiting officers.

The soaked suspect wore shorts and a t-shirt and had a dry bag containing a sweater and training pants.

When officers questioned him, he claimed he was in training for a charity swim.

They initially questioned him, believing his antics could have been terrorist-related.

But a source said it became clear that he was likely a member of a green protest group like Extinction Rebellion or an offshoot of Britain’s isolate.

The source said the man was believed to have been on a reconnaissance mission to gather information to disrupt preparations for Monday’s funeral.

Officers viewed the images captured by the man’s camera, but let him go with a tap due to lack of evidence.

The unfortunate man in his twenties was spotted in a no-go area in the early hours as police began preparing for the largest security operation the country has ever seen ahead of Her Majesty’s state funeral on Monday

Police went in after a concerned member of the public called 999 because they believed they had seen a body floating in the water at 3:25 a.m. Monday.

The security breach took place just yards from Westminster Hall, where the Queen’s body now lies in state for her funeral on Monday.

It came 24 hours before King Charles made his first speech as monarch to both Houses of Parliament.

An RNLI lifeboat rushed to the scene and the police arrived quickly.

He was helped off the jetty leading to the water at Victoria Tower Gardens, a few yards from Westminster Hall.

The source said: ‘He scrambled up the jetty – which he presumably used to get into the river – but the police were at the top.

The footage on his Go-Pro showed possible ways to raid the Houses of Parliament and its outbuildings, including Westminster Hall, and ways to get into the water.

Whatever his motives, his excuse for training for a charity swim was laughable.

“He read the riot law. The police looked at the images he had taken. It showed a no-go area outside the Palace of Westminster, which has been cuffed and patrolled by armed police in boats.

“He had also filmed the walls on the river side, 50 yards from where the Queen’s body will lie, and possible access routes to it.

“The officers concluded that he was part of a team that planned to protest in the coming days while the Queen lies in state in Westminster Hall.

“They could have even prepared to mobilize on the day of the state funeral, when her coffin is taken from Westminster Hall.

“But there was no real hard evidence of what he was up to, so they had to let him go.”

A Scotland Yard spokesman said: ‘On Monday 12 September around 3:25 am, police came across a man in the River Thames who appeared to be using a flotation device.

“He came out of the water at Victoria Tower Gardens. Agents approached him. He was advised about his proximity to a restricted area. He hasn’t been arrested.’

It came when the Houses of Parliament were surrounded by a steel ring as part of the largest police operation in history.

Up to 10,000 officers – including specialized teams – have been on duty every day, as hundreds of thousands of people pour into the capital ahead of the Queen’s funeral on Monday.

All leave and training sessions have been canceled and policing of troops from across the country has been called in by troops from across the country as part of the “complex operation.”

Additional protection and firearms teams have also been deployed by troops outside London to help guard public figures and foreign dignitaries flying in to attend the funeral.

Plans include dealing with protest groups.

Stuart Cundy, deputy deputy commissioner of the Metropolitan Police, said: ‘We know there are people who want to protest against all kinds of things, even in this time of national mourning.

“People have the right to freedom of expression and we need to balance the rights of protesters with those of others who want to mourn and reflect.”

Climate activists have previously brought the country to a standstill in a series of protests using tactics including sticking themselves to trains, marching through the streets and blocking cars and even ambulances on highways.

A source said it became clear that he was likely a member of a green protest group such as Extinction Rebellion or an offshoot of Britain’s isolation. Pictured: Extinction Rebellion activists outside the Houses of Parliament protest in support of ‘Citizens Assembly’

On the day the Queen died, Extinction Rebellion canceled a major planned protest in Hyde Park until further notice.

Organizers said the “difficult decision” was made as it was believed it would not be “practical” to continue with the protest, as huge crowds and massive police presence during the mourning period would put the mobilization at risk. efforts of the group. ‘.

Activists had organized a three-day occupation of the Royal Park in central London and said it was part of preparations for larger demonstrations planned for next spring, with the group hoping to mobilize 100,000 protesters.

Members of the group would camp from Saturday to Tuesday during the so-called “Festival of the Resistance” in an effort to recruit new activists.

Despite the move, XR Rebellion is planning a meeting this Sunday at Lincoln’s Inn Fields, two miles from Westminster.

Just days before the Queen’s death, activists from the group broke security at the Palace of Westminster by posing as tourists before gluing themselves to the chair in the House of Commons chamber.

The September 2 protest, which involved about 50 Extinction Rebellion members, also saw an activist climb a scaffolding near Westminster Hall, where the Queen now lies in state, while two others used bicycle locks to chain themselves to the railings of the New Palace Yard Entrance.

The Metropolitan Police made eight arrests and launched an investigation into the incident.

Insulate Britain has mounted a series of protests against the blocking of highways and ports since the launch of a campaign of civil resistance just a year ago.

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