New Alabama Law Allows Gun Owners To Concealed Carry Without A Permit


Alabama has become the latest state to allow people to carry a concealed handgun without a permit that requires a background check.

The new state law took effect on New Year’s Day, ending the requirement for lawful gun owners to obtain a permit to carry a concealed gun in public. A person can still choose to get a permit if they want to.

The proposal had been unsuccessfully tabled in Montgomery for ten years before being approved by the opposition of the Alabama Sheriffs Association this year.

The legislation was defended by gun rights advocates, who call it “constitutional carry,” in reference to the Second Amendment right to keep and carry guns.

A law that took effect Sunday makes Alabama the 26th state to allow legal gun owners to carry concealed firearms without having a permit

A law that took effect Sunday makes Alabama the 26th state to allow legal gun owners to carry concealed firearms without having a permit

Opponents, including state sheriffs and others in law enforcement, argued that the permits help fight crime and increase public safety.

Alabama Governor Kay Ivey, a Republican, signed the bill almost immediately after it passed in March, highlighting her support for her re-election campaign.

The ad showed the governor sitting at her desk in the Alabama Capitol, pulling a small gun from her purse, along with lipstick and a cell phone.

According to the US Concealed Carry Association, including Alabama, there are now 26 US states that allow concealed carry without permission.

“It will be a big step in helping the average law-abiding citizen avoid having to go through the hoops to get a permit to carry their guns,” said Representative Shane Stringer, the legislation’s sponsor.

Stringer noted that the law only affects the permit requirement. It doesn’t change who can and can’t carry a gun. People who are now banned are still banned.”

The Alabama Sheriffs Association opposed the legislation, saying the licensing process is an important safeguard. Sheriff’s offices also make money from fees for issuing carry permits.

Alabama Governor Kay Ivey, a Republican, almost immediately signed the law into law

Alabama Governor Kay Ivey, a Republican, almost immediately signed the law into law

Alabama Governor Kay Ivey, a Republican, almost immediately signed the law into law

“The sheriffs of Alabama are clear about the law going into effect on January 1 and have adapted accordingly,” said Lee County Sheriff Jay Jones, president of the Alabama Sheriffs Association.

Jones and Stringer said there are still reasons why someone might consider getting a permit.

Jones said, “It’s wise to keep a concealed carry permit in Alabama if you’re traveling out of state; reciprocity applies – other states may require non-residents to have a permit from their state of residence.”

Stringer noted that people need to remember that there are still places where guns are completely banned for safety reasons, such as courthouses, schools and other government buildings.

Alabama lawmakers, under pressure from gun rights activists, passed the measure during the last legislature.

Republican lawmakers who previously opposed the legislation said they were more comfortable voting for it this time around because the state was developing a “banned persons” database to help officers flag people who have been charged because of their criminal history and other reasons should not own a handgun.

A custom gun and bow shop can be seen across the street from the Mercedes Drive Church of Christ church in Vance, Alabama in a file photo

A custom gun and bow shop can be seen across the street from the Mercedes Drive Church of Christ church in Vance, Alabama in a file photo

A custom gun and bow shop can be seen across the street from the Mercedes Drive Church of Christ church in Vance, Alabama in a file photo

The database was mandated by a previous state law that created an option to get a lifetime concealed carry permit.

Stringer, a former deputy sheriff and former Satsuma police chief, said the database was an important factor in his decision to sponsor the bill.

Proponents of the bill argued that it will be a better system for removing guns from people who cannot legally own them. Opponents argued that the database will only be as good as the data entered into it and that information gaps will be inevitable.

Hal Taylor, the head of the Alabama Law Enforcement Agency, sent Ivey a memo on Sept. 30 saying the database had been developed as required by state law.

“Whether issuing a traffic ticket or investigating criminal activity, all officers using the Law Enforcement Tactical System can now be instantly notified of someone’s ineligibility to own a firearm,” Taylor wrote. in the memo.

Lawmakers have included language in the new law reiterating that an officer can temporarily grab a gun during a traffic stop or other investigation.

An officer with reasonable suspicion that a person was about to commit criminal conduct can temporarily grab a gun and run it through databases to see if the gun was stolen.

An officer may also temporarily carry a weapon if necessary for the safety of the officer or others. The weapon must be returned unless there is an arrest or the person poses a security risk.

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